What Am I Going To Do When I Grow Up?

Posts Tagged ‘leadership

From:  Moltz, B.J. (2008).  Bounce! Failure, resiliency, and confidence to achieve your next great success.  Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.

There are a lot of misconceptions about humility.  Most of us become familiar with the term through the idiom ‘to eat humble pie’ when we need to apologize for an error.  But true humility isn’t groveling or even being fearful, shy, or retiring.  It doesn’t mean always putting the other guy ahead of you.  Humility isn’t something you decide you want and then develop it overnight.  Humility requires experience, openness, and a willingness to take chances and to make mistakes – and sometimes to even look publicly dull.

As real businesspeople experience a veritable roller coaster ride of failures, bankruptcies, and breakdowns, they begin to discover the profoundly curvy and unpredictable lines of all these business lives.  Those messy lines help create humility (Moltz, 2008, p. 54-55).

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From:  Marston, C. (2007). Motivating the ‘what’s in it for me? Workforce: manage across the generational divide and increase profits.  Hoboken NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

So what will it take to harness the skills of a multigenerational workforce?  What are today’s requirements for leading young people who see Baby Boomers as outdated and out of touch?  It will take:

·         A new understanding of what employees want from their jobs, their bosses, and their workplace experience.

·         A new understanding of loyalty – how the word has changed, why it changed, and why pay benefits, and opportunities for promotion are not nearly as important in creating job loyalty as they used to be.

·         A new definition of ‘self’ – that young employees today define themselves by who they are outside the job, not by what they do for a living, which is a departure from senior generations.

·         A new behavior from leaders in the workplace who must realize that younger generations enter the workplace seeing self-fulfillment from the get-go and aren’t interested in paying their dues for an unknown period of time.

·         A new comprehension that youth today remain in their youth much longer than ever before, being able to live at home longer, stay in school longer, get married later, and have children later, which dramatically affects their commitment to the workplace (Marston, 2007, p.10).

From:  Marston, C. (2007). Motivating the ‘what’s in it for me? Workforce: manage across the generational divide and increase profits.  Hoboken NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

So what will it take to harness the skills of a multigenerational workforce?  What are today’s requirements for leading young people who see Baby Boomers as outdated and out of touch?  It will take:

·         A new understanding of what employees want from their jobs, their bosses, and their workplace experience.

·         A new understanding of loyalty – how the word has changed, why it changed, and why pay benefits, and opportunities for promotion are not nearly as important in creating job loyalty as they used to be.

·         A new definition of ‘self’ – that young employees today define themselves by who they are outside the job, not by what they do for a living, which is a departure from senior generations.

·         A new behavior from leaders in the workplace who must realize that younger generations enter the workplace seeing self-fulfillment from the get-go and aren’t interested in paying their dues for an unknown period of time.

·         A new comprehension that youth today remain in their youth much longer than ever before, being able to live at home longer, stay in school longer, get married later, and have children later, which dramatically affects their commitment to the workplace (Marston, 2007, p.10).

From: Riffenbary, J. (2007). No excuse! incorporating core values, accountability, and balance into our life and career. Possibility Press.

To laugh is to risk appearing a fool. To weep is to risk appearing sentimental. To reach out to another is to risk exposing your true self. To place your ideas, your dreams, before the crowd, is to risk their loss. To love is to risk not being loved in return. To live is to risk dying. To hope is to risk despair. To try is to risk failure. But risks need to be taken because the greatest hazard in life is to risk nothing.

The person who risks nothing does nothing, has nothing, is nothing. He may avoid suffering and sorrow, but he simply cannot learn, feel, change, grow, love…live. Chained by his beliefs, he is a slave; he has forfeited freedom. Only a person who risks is free. – Edwin Land (Riffenbary, 2007, p. 18).


Evelyn Van Til


Practicing Purpose with Passion!

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