What Am I Going To Do When I Grow Up?

Archive for August 2009

From:  Marston, C. (2007). Motivating the ‘what’s in it for me? Workforce: manage across the generational divide and increase profits.  Hoboken NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

So what will it take to harness the skills of a multigenerational workforce?  What are today’s requirements for leading young people who see Baby Boomers as outdated and out of touch?  It will take:

·         A new understanding of what employees want from their jobs, their bosses, and their workplace experience.

·         A new understanding of loyalty – how the word has changed, why it changed, and why pay benefits, and opportunities for promotion are not nearly as important in creating job loyalty as they used to be.

·         A new definition of ‘self’ – that young employees today define themselves by who they are outside the job, not by what they do for a living, which is a departure from senior generations.

·         A new behavior from leaders in the workplace who must realize that younger generations enter the workplace seeing self-fulfillment from the get-go and aren’t interested in paying their dues for an unknown period of time.

·         A new comprehension that youth today remain in their youth much longer than ever before, being able to live at home longer, stay in school longer, get married later, and have children later, which dramatically affects their commitment to the workplace (Marston, 2007, p.10).

From:  Marston, C. (2007). Motivating the ‘what’s in it for me? Workforce: manage across the generational divide and increase profits.  Hoboken NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

So what will it take to harness the skills of a multigenerational workforce?  What are today’s requirements for leading young people who see Baby Boomers as outdated and out of touch?  It will take:

·         A new understanding of what employees want from their jobs, their bosses, and their workplace experience.

·         A new understanding of loyalty – how the word has changed, why it changed, and why pay benefits, and opportunities for promotion are not nearly as important in creating job loyalty as they used to be.

·         A new definition of ‘self’ – that young employees today define themselves by who they are outside the job, not by what they do for a living, which is a departure from senior generations.

·         A new behavior from leaders in the workplace who must realize that younger generations enter the workplace seeing self-fulfillment from the get-go and aren’t interested in paying their dues for an unknown period of time.

·         A new comprehension that youth today remain in their youth much longer than ever before, being able to live at home longer, stay in school longer, get married later, and have children later, which dramatically affects their commitment to the workplace (Marston, 2007, p.10).

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From:  Howatt, W. A., (2008).  Leadership vs. management.  Kentville, Nova Scotia: Howatt HR Consulting Inc.

1.      “Create constancy and purpose on an on-going basis so everyone knows why and what they are doing.

2.      Teach all to adapt to change, and work to keep ahead of change, because change needs to happen to ensure quality.

3.      Stop micro managing quality; instead, build quality self-assessment into the process and company culture.

4.      Build on long term relationships vs. going with the lowest priced person.

5.      Commit to daily improvement, with an understanding that this is an on-going process that never ends.

6.      Institute job training and on-going professional development.

7.      Offer leadership development; do not assume promotions make leaders.

8.      Remove all fear from the organization.

9.      Remove and break down any barriers between groups within the company.

10. Eliminate targets from the workforce; they need to be driven by the employees, not management.

11. Eliminate numerical goals for production; instead, work on developing methods for improving production and quality.

12. Eliminate barriers that removed workmanship pride.

13. Institute a program of company-wide self improvement and development.

14. Develop company-wide action plans that involve every employee, with the goal of creating a company-wide transformation to quality.

These are the fourteen critical factors that W. Edwards Deming created (professionally accepted philosopher and process developer) (Howatt, 2008, p.14).”

From: Riffenbary, J. (2007). No excuse! incorporating core values, accountability, and balance into our life and career. Possibility Press.

To laugh is to risk appearing a fool. To weep is to risk appearing sentimental. To reach out to another is to risk exposing your true self. To place your ideas, your dreams, before the crowd, is to risk their loss. To love is to risk not being loved in return. To live is to risk dying. To hope is to risk despair. To try is to risk failure. But risks need to be taken because the greatest hazard in life is to risk nothing.

The person who risks nothing does nothing, has nothing, is nothing. He may avoid suffering and sorrow, but he simply cannot learn, feel, change, grow, love…live. Chained by his beliefs, he is a slave; he has forfeited freedom. Only a person who risks is free. – Edwin Land (Riffenbary, 2007, p. 18).